History of Carolina 101

By kendallhart808
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History of Carolina 101

Postby kendallhart808 » November 7th 2017, 4:19 am

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Welcome! I'm so glad that you could make it to our new class, History of Carolina 101. I am your professor, Dr. Hart, here at University of Warsiene Islands at Nouvelle Heide. This class is somewhat Project Palmetto and somewhat something totally different, to hopefully help people understand Carolina's history, and not see it as a US proxy-state. At the same time, it is helping to set up a new Carolina which will hopefully fall more under the lines of history, and not stand out in contrast to world history.

*Not Roleplay: Stan, Federico, and I have been working on a Carolina which will hopefully flow more in-line with history instead of pushing it entirely to the side like Carolina does now. I as well as the others believe that it is the best to make sure Carolina flows with history instead of going against it, because the best countries stem off real historical ideas, and not necessarily fantasies. However, this also embodies something that I have wanted to do for a long time, which is "teach" Carolinian history to the alliance, so that everyone can understand it. I will try to work on this every other day when I can, to bring Y'all a short item such as a small "scholarly article", "page from a textbook", video etc. It won't be anything big but the detail should be quite descriptive.

So welcome to Carolina 101, I hope everyone is ready for our first day of class.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6E9WU9TGrec
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Re: History of Carolina 101

Postby Michael » November 7th 2017, 8:58 pm

Very interesting information, and I like the presentation style
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kendallhart808
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Re: History of Carolina 101

Postby kendallhart808 » November 8th 2017, 3:07 am

Agenda:
Class Agenda for the coming days
Lesson 2: Early French Colonization in the Americas
Lesson 3: Treaty of Utrecht
Lesson 4: The English-Huguenot Divide
Lesson 5: French and Indian War
Lesson 6: American Revolution (Overview)
Lesson 7: American Revolution (In-depth detail of Huguenot support/reluctance)
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Re: History of Carolina 101

Postby kendallhart808 » November 10th 2017, 4:05 am

So I have decided to go ahead and talk about both Lesson 2 and Lesson 3 at the same time in sort of a mini-lecture. Honestly, it's early colonial history, so I don't think that there is much to talk about here.

The French, under the leadership of Jean Renault, left England to establish a new colony in the Americas where the vast majority of French Huguenots could live, separate from metropolitan France. If you are wondering, yes this did happen. The initial settlement occurred at Charlesfort in modern-day South Carolina, and the colony was on the site of today's Charleston. Despite enduring a rough first year, the colony generally turned out to be a success, although it did struggle along for a while since the area was swampy. Further south, the French did not have such good luck. The French tried to establish Fort Caroline on the mouth of the St. James River near Jacksonville, Florida. It began as a successful colony, however, the Spanish felt threatened, and dispatched an army to march from St. Augustine to Fort Caroline in order to wipe out the French. This occurred, and Renault sailed back north to Charlesfort.

The colony, which eventually became known as Carolina became a tobacco-based colony, similar to the British Virginia colony in the north. While it claimed the James River in Virginia as it's northern border, it only controlled up to the Cape Fear River in North Carolina. While the Carolina colony was primarily a settler colony, tobacco farming rose throughout the 17th century. By 1650, tobacco was the largest industry in Carolina and produced significant profits for the Carolina Colony.

With the Huguenot Rebellions in the 1620's followed by increasing persecution, Carolina saw a large increase in both forced and willing immigration. After the Huguenot Rebellion, Huguenot leaders were forced into exile on the Carolinian frontiers, namely near the towns of Augusta and Colomb. However, in 1627, exiled leaders met in the town of Villeneuve in order to discuss a Huguenot Rebellion in Carolina. The leaders of the Villeneuve Conference decided to declare independence, hoping England would support their efforts to become independent or join the English colonies. However, independence was a short-lived dream.

The new government, which was also decided by the Villeneuve Conference was seemingly modeled from the Dutch Republic. Ideally, it was not to be permanent, as most of the people who attended the conference, mostly Huguenot religious figures realized that the colony was not very well developed. Rather it was to act as a proxy to gain English attention and annexation. England, hoping to seize further tax revenue, asked the Virginia to send troops to annex the Carolina colony as a part of Virginia. This generally failed, as the Huguenots did not want to become a part of Virginia. The Huguenot Republic as it was called, quickly collapsed under the pressure of the French military. However, the ideals of the rebellions permeated the people of Carolina, who now more than ever wanted to become part of England instead of France. The insurrection continued until the English finally invaded Charlesfort in 1629, two months before the Peace of Ales and the end of the Huguenot rebellions. With the fall of Charlesfort, the English annexed the Carolina Colony, turning it into the Province of Carolina. The Treaty of Utrecht (1629) formally ceded authority of Carolina to Britain, with little in return for France. In fact, the only concession is that the English declared they would transport any Huguenots who wished to go to Carolina, free of charge from the French government.

So why did France make this deal? Well, France did not think that it could reassert control over Carolina in 1629. At the time, it seemed like the colony was destined to stay in rebellion, either to become part of the English colonies or to create its own government. France's inferior naval position to England meant that even if the French wanted to reassert control, as long as England supported Carolina they would not be able to. The British resettlement allowance actually was a large reward for the French government, which saw a large amount of their rebellious Huguenot population be transferred out of the country, free of charge.
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Re: History of Carolina 101

Postby kendallhart808 » November 13th 2017, 2:17 am

Further going off the light agenda I posted earlier, today we are not going to talk much about the English-Huguenot divide, mainly because after thinking about it, that divide did not entirely exist. There was a honeymoon period of Carolina where the colonists were incredibly happy to be under English rule, because it meant that they no longer had to be worried about the French taking away their rights. At the same time, a lot of other Huguenots were coming to Carolina and the Province of Carolina was primarily Huguenot, even in 1700. The English found that the Huguenots were quite loyal, and as a result were not forced into learning English, as only their high officials had to do that. So therefore, the English and the Huguenots led a relatively closely linked life throughout colonization.

So what are we learning about today. Well, English colonization. And honestly I hate talking about colonization as I find it my most boring subject, so I am going to leave it to John Green.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TTYOQ05oDOI&index=3&list=PLqfqeCh72YERmVLH50u655gJCFrs1XLpChttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p47tZLJbdag&list=PLqfqeCh72YERmVLH50u655gJCFrs1XLpC&index=4
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Re: History of Carolina 101

Postby kendallhart808 » November 15th 2017, 10:21 pm

Today's Lesson: The French and Indian War
Today we are going to learn about a war that many scholars will say began the road to the American Revolution. I didn't have much time for this,
as usual, and to be completely honest, I think that the crash course video's explain it further than I could. Next class, which is probably on Friday will explore how the colonists in Carolina dealt with colonization and the French and Indian War, and the next week, we're off to the American Revolution.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5vKGU3aEGss
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Re: History of Carolina 101

Postby kendallhart808 » November 26th 2017, 10:46 pm

Okay, so I would like to progress further with this and really get to the point because at this point I did the background, and most of y'all realize that at least in some way or another these people are generally more French than their northern counterparts in the English colonies. This remains the same up through the revolutionary war as the French culture exists even if the French do not necessarily own the land. Think of these people as Cajuns like in Louisiana. So I think most people know what happens next, the colonies get fed up with the taxes, they rebel and here comes the United States. Well in the south, mainly in Georgia but also to a lesser extent in North and South Carolina, they are more apprehensive than the New England states or Virginia. The reason in RL is that they were worried about slave insurrections and Indian raids, and this will continue to be true in our timeline but also there is a slight worry that the northern (everything north of North Carolina at least) are going to dominate the government and the English will overpower the French. However, they really kinda go with the revolution anyway just like Georgia (who did not send delegates to the 1st Continental Congress). I don't know of a specific event that really influences them but they just really join. Remember the whole English states dominating thing, that will come back.

Okay Lets go to the Lesson:
Westward Expansion and the Expansion of Slavery
So why was slavery so popular in the south? Why did it not just die out, like it sort of did in Brazil? Well this video will explain a lot about what led and motivated the rise of slavery through the beginning and middle of the 1800's in the American South and Carolinian states. Watch from 7:35 to 11:23
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nyGWypYWB_Q

So what was slavery like and what distinguishes it from other slave based systems say in the West Indies or Brazil. Well the answer to the second part of that, is that slavery in the US was a self-sustaining system which was not found as much in Brazil, thus the reason why Brazil needed to import slaves and why slavery began to decline when Britain forced them to honor an early agreement banning the trade. As for the treatment of slaves, here is another video for you guys to watch. Watch from 5:53 to 9:15.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ajn9g5Gsv98

So what else did slaves do or build for the southern economy. Here to help me, and hopefully a slight break from the depressing nature of this topic is a clip from Black-ish:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MzaUTbnh_CQ

So we are almost off of this topic but there is one more video that I would like to show, and that is really in regards to Harriet Tubman. Most people know that name, because she is sort of a hero in both the United States and in AIN Carolina. She helped slaves escape from the south to the north and developed the underground railroad. Below is a modified clip from the first documentary explaining her situation and what it really meant to the institution of slavery because it was not just about freeing people.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Bdno2YLm4Ms

Okay, now lets talk westward expansion a little bit, and not in general. Instead this is looking at the westward expansion in the Carolinian states. So in 1776 the extremely vast majority of Carolinians lived in either Central and Eastern North Carolina, South Carolina, or Eastern Georgia. A few had trickled out into what would become Tennessee, Western Georgia, but few if any made it to Alabama and Mississippi. Carolinian westward expansion nearly started instantaneously as farmers headed west in search of new land. For the first bit, settlers should have moved directly west as the areas which we know today to be Alabama, Mississippi, and Tennessee were actually part of the three eastern states and their westward claims. Carolinian's began moving into these western lands and thus the spread of the Carolinian culture had begun.

To be clear, there are no records of where emigrants in the US came from and thus I cannot trace emigration maps that tell me certain amounts of people came from certain states. However, I have made some reasonable guesses based on population trends and locations. So starting with Tennessee. Tennessee was originally a part of North Carolina which was ceded in 1791 to form the Southwest Territory. At that time it had a population of 35,000, most of which I would assume came from North Carolina since Virginians tended to move into Kentucky (since at that time still would have been in Virginia). The population had grown to 77,000 by 1795 and thus Tennessee became a state. At this time, I would assume that a fairly large portion has still come from the Carolinian states. Most of the population was focused in the Washington District, which was to the eastern part of the territory which would have meant that this area was easily accessible to most North Carolinians. Those who lived in the Mero District (11,000) would likely have come from either South Carolina or Georgia and migrated northeast to find new land in the valley. Okay onto Alabama and Mississippi which I will do jointly because this is getting long winded. Most of that population likely came from Georgia or South Carolina. I do not have many facts to back this up but given that the states are directly west of these two states makes it likely. If you also look, slave practices were generally common across these states which would be considered the Deep South, and while it may be the crop, if you look at Kentucky, their slave practices show similar signs to that of Virginia.

Okay now looking at both Florida and Louisiana. Florida I could place a solid bet on having immigrants from either Georgia or South Carolina, as those in North Carolina or Virginia would likely see it as to far to go for land. At the same time, those who live in Georgia would be more accustomed to the weather of Florida and it's more swampy land. As for Louisiana. Louisiana already had a permanent French Catholic population living there, either from those who settled in the Louisiana Colony or from deported French Canadians who settled down their. Their culture would also mimic that of Carolina and thus Louisana would be a drawing point for Carolinian's to settle because they would be with people like them. Also keep in mind that people will be moving west across the Alabama Territory from Georgia and South Carolina, and those people will be Carolinians. I am saying this really because Louisiana is a potential change to Carolina that I wanted to make sure that I looked at. Because settlers would not have stopped at the Mississippi, especially if other people who were culturally similar to them were just across the Mississippi. As for Arkansas, I was unsure about their patterns, wondering if more of their settlers would have come from Kentucky and Missouri and thus have more English than Cajun settlers. Keep in mind that these patterns are not absolute, and Carolinians could be found in Missouri or Kentucky just as English settlers could be found in Mississippi.

So below are a bunch of links that will take you through the American Revolution and the Early years of the United States. For the most part, Carolinian states (NC, SC, GA and later Alabama, Mississippi, Tennessee, and Louisiana) will act like every other southern state. They will join the southern block of states in Congress, most of their delegates speak English, and despite a culture difference, politically they don't have much of a difference from the rest of the Southern US.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Eytc9ZaNWyc&list=PL8dPuuaLjXtMwmepBjTSG593eG7ObzO7s&index=6
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3EiSymRrKI4&list=PL8dPuuaLjXtMwmepBjTSG593eG7ObzO7s&index=7
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bO7FQsCcbD8&index=8&list=PL8dPuuaLjXtMwmepBjTSG593eG7ObzO7s
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r161cLYzuDI&index=9&list=PL8dPuuaLjXtMwmepBjTSG593eG7ObzO7s
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_3Ox6vGteek&list=PL8dPuuaLjXtMwmepBjTSG593eG7ObzO7s&index=10
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qMXqg2PKJZU&index=11&list=PL8dPuuaLjXtMwmepBjTSG593eG7ObzO7s
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=beN4qE-e5O8&list=PL8dPuuaLjXtMwmepBjTSG593eG7ObzO7s&index=14
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t62fUZJvjOs&list=PL8dPuuaLjXtMwmepBjTSG593eG7ObzO7s&index=15

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